Teaser Tuesday: Stanley Middleton’s Holiday

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I’m reading Stanley Middleton’s Holiday, the 1974 Booker Prize winner.  The protagonist, Edwin, is on a seaside holiday following a recent marriage breakup.  Here’s my teaser:

Viewed from a yard or two’s distance on the beach or in the house she was attractive, the belle. Now she approached, she changed, coarsened into the typist-suburban housewife who talked inanities or ironed in semi-detached houses the country over.

page 57, Holiday, by Stanley Middleton

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: A History of Their Own

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I’m reading A History of Their Own, Volume I, which is a comprehensive view of women in Europe from prehistory to the present time. Here’s my teaser (I had to use 3 sentences for it to make sense):

Not only did the church restrict and confine women, but the facts of their past achievements and authority were ridiculed. The woman remembered for exceptional learning, piety, and power was not Lioba, Saint Hilda, Herrad of Landsberg, or Hildegard of Bingen.  Instead the fantasy of a thirteenth-century French Dominican, Steven of Bourbon, was passed on from generation to generation, the tale of the fictitious Pope Joan.

page 193, A History of Their Own, Volume I, by Bonnie S. Anderson & Judith P. Zinsser

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Sarah Hall’s Haweswater

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I just started Sarah Hall’s novel Haweswater, which won the 2003 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize for Best First Book.  I always choose my teaser from pages I’ve already read, and this one takes place right at the beginning.  Here’s my teaser — can you guess what’s happening?

On the bed she fought with her own body, with God, with nature, unmaking herself.  This was what her husband could not bear.

page 3, Haweswater, by Sarah Hall

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Georgette Heyer’s These Old Shades

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I’m reading Georgette Heyer’s These Old Shades, a romance set primarily in France, during the reign of King Louis XV.  Here’s my teaser:

‘Yes, it is true,’ nodded Lavoulère. ‘When I set eyes on her it came to me in a flash that I had met her before. Is it possible that I have done so, Davenant?’

page 245, These Old Shades, by Georgette Heyer

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Pat Barker’s The Eye in the Door

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I’m reading The Eye in the Door, the second novel in Pat Barker’s Regeneration trilogy, set during World War I.  Much of the plot concerns rehabilitation of soldiers dramatically affected by events at the front.  Here’s my teaser:

In a rational society, a man who spent his days like that wouldn’t have to spend his evenings, his own time, remember, with men who could perfectly well be left to get on with their own lives in their own way. The fact that he’s prepared to do it is a tribute to Head.

page 72, The Eye in the Door, by Pat Barker

Read my review of Regeneration

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Sibilla Aleramo’s A Woman

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I’m reading Sibilla Aleramo’s A Woman, an early work of feminist literature.  It is autobiographical, describing a woman’s imprisonment in marriage and, later, independence.  Here’s my teaser:

On the seventh or eighth night after he was born, as I turned to the suckling baby murmuring words of love, I saw his childish face form a smile, a long, miraculous smile, full and splendid. It had such a powerful effect on me I thought I would faint.

page 64, A Woman, by Sibilla Aleramo

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Antonia White’s Beyond the Glass

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. Last night I finished Beyond the Glass, by Antonia White.  It’s the last book in a series of semi-autobiographical novels set in the World War I era and beyond.  In this book, the protagonist Clara is a young woman trying to put a bad marriage behind her. Here’s my teaser:

Isabel strained her ears in vain to catch what was being said the other end. Claude’s almost monosyllabic questions and replies came at long intervals, and gave her little comfort except the knowledge that Clara was there.

page 196, Beyond the Glass, by Antonia White

Read my review of Beyond the Glass.

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Alison Weir’s Eleanor of Aquitaine

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I’m currently reading Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Life , a biography of one of the most powerful women in Europe during the Middle Ages.  I don’t know about you, but non-fiction never seems to “tease” me the way fiction does.  I was surprised when my random page number generator turned up something juicy. Here’s my teaser:

The buoyant tone of these charters suggests that Eleanor was happy in her new marriage. What was to become one of the most turbulent royal marriages in history seems to have begun well.

page 92, Eleanor of Aquitaine: A Life, by Alison Weir

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Langston Hughes’ The Ways of White Folks

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I’m currently reading The Ways of White Folks, short stories about racism in early 20th century America.  In Home, a young black man returns to his Missouri hometown after an extended stay in Europe where he studied violin and performed with famous orchestras.  In his hometown he is met with hostility and prejudice — a marked contrast to his appreciative audiences in Europe.  Here’s my teaser:

Why did you cry, Ma, when I went away with the minstrel show, playing coon songs through the South instead of hymns? What did you cry for, Ma, when I wrote you I had a job with a night-club jazz band on State Street in Chicago?

page 41, The Ways of White Folks, by Langston Hughes

Bookmark and Share

Teaser Tuesday: Pat Barker’s Regeneration

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by MizB at Should be Reading. The idea is to share a couple of “teaser” sentences from a random page in your current read. I currently have two books on the go; one of them is Regeneration, by Pat Barker.  Set during World War I, it is a fictionalized account of Siegfried Sassoon, a poet who refused to return to the front after an injury, and found himself in a war hospital, being treated for supposed shell-shock.

Everything about the poem suggested that Sassoon’s attitude to his war experience had been the opposite of what one normally encountered.  The typical patient, arriving at Craiglockhart, had usually been devoting considerable energy to the task of forgetting whatever traumatic events had precipitated his neurosis.

page 25, Regeneration, by Pat Barker

Bookmark and Share