Review: Miss Mapp, by E.F. Benson

Miss Mapp is the second in E. F. Benson‘s Mapp & Lucia series, satirizing early 20th century provincial English village life.  In this volume we meet Elizabeth Mapp, a notable busybody in the town of Tilling, who spends an inordinate amount of time spying on and gossiping about her neighbors, and using the information she acquires to get the better of her fellow villagers and manipulate events to her advantage.  Miss Mapp’s house is ideally situated for this purpose; from her windows she can see nearly all comings and goings.  She enjoys her reputation as one who knows all, and skillfully covers up when she does not.

As in Queen Lucia, the first book in the series, Miss Mapp does not have an over-arching plot or conflict.  Rather, the novel is a collection of amusing, character-driven vignettes taking place over a period of months.  Miss Mapp is keenly interested in the activities of two mature single men in the town: Major Flint and Captain Puffin.  She has observed they both keep late hours.  The men claim to be hard at work on personal projects, but the reader knows better.  There’s also a running gag about two women wearing the same dress to a party, and their attempts to rectify the situation.  Sometimes Miss Mapp gets the upper hand, but she often makes mistakes — from poorly played bridge hands to more egregious errors in judgement — and must suffer the consequences.

I picked up this book because I was in the mood for something light and fun, and it did not disappoint.  E. F. Benson has a way with words that keeps me smiling from beginning to end.  I’m looking forward to future volumes in this series, and the inevitable meeting of Miss Mapp and Queen Lucia.

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Review: Queen Lucia, by E.F. Benson

Queen Lucia is the first in a series of six novels satirizing a slice of 1920s English society (which Simon at Stuck-in-a-Book recently christened, “Bright Middle-Aged Things”).  Mrs Lucas is the self-appointed “queen” of Riseholme, a sleepy village somewhere near London.  Her speech is littered with Italian phrases, inspiring the nickname Lucia.  She prides herself on staying au courant with all the local gossip, cementing her dominant social position in Riseholme.  Lucia is an amusing character in her own right, and Benson populates Riseholme with an extensive supporting cast.  Mrs Quantock gets caught up in every cultural fad (first yoga, and later spiritualism).  Olga Bracely, an opera singer, takes up residence in Riseholme and threatens to disturb the social order.  Lucia’s dear friend Georgie simultaneously worships Lucia and works to subvert her power.  And there are many more …

In lieu of a complete story arc, the novel meanders through a series of vignettes intended to both define the social order and amuse the reader.  Each one is a comedy of manners where situations and people are not as they seem, misunderstandings abound, and someone gets their comeuppance. Benson’s Riseholme came to life, and  Reading Queen Lucia I was transported to a time when people communicated by letter several times each day, servants were largely invisible until they decided to (shock!) marry one another, and formal dinner parties with music and tableaux were routine entertainment.  It was all quite cozy and fun.

Some readers criticize these books, and the characters, for being shallow and mean-spirited.  But it’s satire — it’s meant to be biting, and the humor makes you stop and think about how ridiculous and self-important people can be.  If you’re looking for light amusement, this is just the ticket.